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Labor Day Weekend Trip to Western Nevada

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My Labor Day weekend trip into Nevada was one of the hottest ones’ yet. Saturday September 2nd the desert heat reached a high of 118 degrees. At those temps the iPhone shuts down, a good DSLR will also shut down and mine did.
But it was all worth it to be able to see the mighty Zorro again, and that wild man named Rogue.

Years ago when I hung out with the Virginia Range horses I found one that didn’t look like the rest. Of course I was clueless and did not know if it was different than all the others, so I did some research. Turns out it could have been a Hinny. A Hinny is a “domestic equine hybrid that is the offspring of a male horse, a stallion, and a female donkey, a jenny. Hinnies are also sometimes classified as mules.These hybrids are sturdy and intelligent equines who have a longer work life, stronger hooves and greater endurance than horses. Mules and hinnies tend to be more resistant to disease and live longer lives than their parents.
I returned to that same area this past weekend and saw another wild horse that didn’t look like the others.

I’m starting to get the same feelings for western Nevada as I do when I visit Yosemite. While driving home, and when I was near Truckee, California I felt a need to pull over and have a moment. I stopped at some burger joint, and had that moment. Their were also burners in that joint having their moments. It was surreal.
My eyes welled-up with water, and I had to eat my burger with my shades on.

Sometimes in your life you find those places that excite you and lure you back again and again.

Western Nevada I will be back, REAL SOON.

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A Horse Tale

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On the Memorial Day 2016 weekend I set out on a wild horse adventure to an area in western Nevada known as the Pine Nut Mountains. I knew the area where I would have wild horse encounters were only accessible via 4×4 vehicles. I rented a Jeep Cherokee.

The first night on the Pine Nut Mountains I camped out on the range, but the weather conditions made for an uncomfortable night. So the next two nights I made my base camp Crystal Springs campground nearby, but it was across the Nevada/California border.

My first night at the campground I was able to get on the range by 8am. That was when I had my first wild horse encounter. I saw the band or group of wild horses alone in the desert seemingly having a meeting. I stopped and photographed that moment.

This is what I determined through research and knowledge of their behavior.

img_7104This wild horse caught my attention because he was waving his tail dramatically and making loud whinny sounds. The sounds coming from that horse were not sounds I heard before from other horses. This horse was also hoofing at something in the desert. I later discovered this horse was hoofing at one of his deceased band mates.

 

 

 

I observed and watched and tried to read the scene. I scanned around and realized a notorious stallion named Zorro by wild horse advocates was barking at a group of horses.
Zorro was seemingly trying to take a horse away from the group?

I then sat still and again tried to figure out was going on, but then I suddenly realized their was a deceased horse on the ground, and the horse who was whining loudly and waving his tail wildly pointed me to the carcass.

I then retreated and tried to process the scene, but I wasn’t smart enough, but after observing them for the remainder of the year and then using what I learned and returning to my photos I then concluded what I witnessed.

In the end a horse named Zorro, who killed more than his fair share of fellow horses, bowed down to the one horse on the range who allowed him to claim a dame.

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