Home

A Horse Tale

Leave a comment

On the Memorial Day 2016 weekend I set out on a wild horse adventure to an area in western Nevada known as the Pine Nut Mountains. I knew the area where I would have wild horse encounters were only accessible via 4×4 vehicles. I rented a Jeep Cherokee.

The first night on the Pine Nut Mountains I camped out on the range, but the weather conditions made for an uncomfortable night. So the next two nights I made my base camp Crystal Springs campground nearby, but it was across the Nevada/California border.

My first night at the campground I was able to get on the range by 8am. That was when I had my first wild horse encounter. I saw the band or group of wild horses alone in the desert seemingly having a meeting. I stopped and photographed that moment.

This is what I determined through research and knowledge of their behavior.

img_7104This wild horse caught my attention because he was waving his tail dramatically and making loud whinny sounds. The sounds coming from that horse were not sounds I heard before from other horses. This horse was also hoofing at something in the desert. I later discovered this horse was hoofing at one of his deceased band mates.

 

 

 

I observed and watched and tried to read the scene. I scanned around and realized a notorious stallion named Zorro by wild horse advocates was barking at a group of horses.
Zorro was seemingly trying to take a horse away from the group?

I then sat still and again tried to figure out was going on, but then I suddenly realized their was a deceased horse on the ground, and the horse who was whining loudly and waving his tail wildly pointed me to the carcass.

I then retreated and tried to process the scene, but I wasn’t smart enough, but after observing them for the remainder of the year and then using what I learned and returning to my photos I then concluded what I witnessed.

In the end a horse named Zorro, who killed more than his fair share of fellow horses, bowed down to the one horse on the range who allowed him to claim a dame.

img_7291

Advertisements

Photojournalism

Leave a comment

One aspect I love about my photos is when I actually look at them. I love photojournalism, which is why I do what I do. It is my favorite type of photography, but sometimes MY photos do indeed trigger emotions.
Mostly my comments are WOW! But sometimes it takes me deeper.
I see the faces within the surrounding environment, and I am just amazed at the various reactions from the folks I’m photographing.
What do you see in this photo?
I see confidence, fear, contemplation, and dependency.

img_4609

Observed Wild Horses in Nevada

Leave a comment

On Memorial Day weekend I once again visited our nation’s wild horses. This time I visited the herd on the Pine Nut Mountain Range in Nevada. That area is an HMA or a herd management area, which means they are “are lands under the supervision of the United States Bureau of Land Management that are managed for the primary but not exclusive benefit of free-roaming ‘wild’ horses and burros.” During previous visits to see wild horses I mostly concentrated my observation of them on the Virginia Range, which is geographically north of the Pine Nut’s. I targeted this herd because they have advocates that speak for them and maintain them. In other word’s they have people who look after them. It is my opinion the wild horse herd in the Pine Nut’s are very special because of the bonds they form between each other. Wild horses are considered by some, to simply be feral horses. Brought on by economic desperation or owners who simply became too poor to care for them, but, after they are in the wild, they are wild again. Wild horses do indeed become themselves after they are free to roam on the ranges. They form their own families, socialize with each other, they adopt or raise their own off spring, they have leaders, followers, babysitters, and bosses, and many become best friends’. Observing wild horses is simply the most amazing experience a wildlife photographer could do for themselves.

Coyote encounter while leaving Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival 2014

Leave a comment

True story, while leaving the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival I decided to go back to the wildlife area and look for those owls. It just so happens, I found the owls, who were fighting with the ravens, but then once again, another hiker pointed out the Coyote was staring at me.

This owl was being mobbed by Ravens

Coyote encounter Golden Gate Park Coyote encounter Golden Gate Park  Coyote encounter Golden Gate Park

Other wildlife I encountered on the Virginia Range in Nevada

Leave a comment

There were other wildlife I spotted while I was hiking on the Virginia Range in Nevada.

A Great Basin Collared lizard.

Collared Lizard

And a jackrabbit.

Jackrabbit

Wild Horses on the Virginia Range in Nevada

Leave a comment

I photographed and observed the wild horses on the Virginia Range for 3 days. Temps were in the 100’s, and the Virginia Range is a riparian forest or desert. The Virginia Range is mostly private property. I watched the wild horses, live, play, fight, socialize and I even watched one die. They are very affectionate animals and they always took the time to observe me.

A few facts about horses:

  1. Scientific name: Equus ferus caballus
  2. Lifespan: 25 – 30 y
  3. Mass: 500 kg on average (Adult)
  4. Speed: 40 – 48 km/h (Galloping), 19 – 24 km/h (Canter), 6.4 km/h on average (Walk), 13 – 19 km/h (Trot)
    Wild Horses on the Virginia Range

    I watched this one die. It was walking awkwardly, so I stopped and watched it for a while. He then suddenly laid down on the ground hard, let out a squeal, and then he stopped breathing.

    I watched this one die. It was walking awkwardly, so I stopped and watched it for a while. He then suddenly laid down on the ground hard, let out a squeal, and then he stopped breathing.

    Wild Horses on the Virginia Range Wild Horses on the Virginia Range Wild Horses on the Virginia Range After a monsoon IMG_2461 Wild Horses on the Virginia Range Wild Horses on the Virginia Range Wild Horses on the Virginia Range Wild Horses on the Virginia Range Wild Horses on the Virginia Range Wild Horses on the Virginia Range Wild Horses on the Virginia Range
    Baby horse with the momma.

    Baby horse with the momma.

Coyote Encounters on the Virginia Range in Nevada

Leave a comment

I encountered several Coyotes while exploring, scouting-for and or discovering the wildlife on the Virginia Range in Nevada. I cannot give up the exact location, but they live amongst wild horses, free range cattle, and heavy truck and or auto traffic east of Reno Nevada.

Went out to photograph wild horses, and also met a  Coyote.

Went out to photograph wild horses, and also met a Coyote.

Went out to photograph wild horses, and also met a Coyote.

Went out to photograph wild horses, and also met a Coyote.

Went out to photograph wild horses, and also met a Coyote.

Went out to photograph wild horses, and also met a Coyote.

Went out to photograph wild horses, and also met a  Coyote.

Went out to photograph wild horses, and also met a Coyote.

Taking the High Road!

Taking the High Road!

Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: